Metaphors--instead of summaries
Alive
Alive

The play at the beginning of the story symbolizes how April is acting out her part in life and how she has no actual desire to be a house wife but would rather be somewhere else in life, without Frank and without children. "Then before his very eyes she would dissolve and change into the graceless, suffereing creature whose existence he tried every day of his life to deny but whom he knew as well and as painfully as he knew himself, a gaunt constricted woman whose red eyes flashed reproach, who false smile in the curtain call was as homely as his own sore feet, his own damp clinging underwear and his own sour smell." (page 13)



Picture Window
Picture Window

The picture window symbolizes the closed in life of April and Frank. This window is located in front of their house and can be found in the beginning either opened or closed depending on the situation occuring inside of the home. "Straight ahead, two or three hundred yards away, the earth rose high above the moonlit telephone wires to form the mound of Revolutionary Hill, along whose summit winked the friendly picture windows of the Revolutionary Hill Estates." (page27) The window is also crucial because it shows the contrast between the other families that live in the neighborhood and the Wheeler family, which is April and Frank's family. Unlike the other windows, the Wheeler's is not friendly and loving like the rest of the neighborhood. As they are buying the house April says, "Of course it does have the picture window; I guess there's no escaping that." Frank then says, "I guess not, still I don't suppose one picture window is necessarily going to destroy our personalities." (page31) This quote shows how April does not want to be part of the rest of the society yet Frank does not object to the society, although he thinks that they will be able to bypass the lives of everyone else, and be individuals.


Revolutionary Road
Revolutionary Road

The Revolutionary Road symbolizes the life of the daily American family, and what society expects. However, it also symbolizes the trip that April and Frank take through their marriage and the unlimate peril that occurs at the very end of the road. "Now at of course it isn't a very desireable road down at this end," she explained, her glance switching birdlike between the road and their pleased attentive faces as she made the turn off Road Twelve. "As you see, it's mostly these little cinder-blocky, pickup-trucky places--plumbers, carpenters, little local people of that sort. And then eventually"-- she aimed the stiff pistol of her index finger straight through the windshield in fair warning, causing a number of metal bracelets to jingle and click against the steering wheel-- "eventually it leads on up and around to a perfectly dreadful new developement called Revolutionary Road Estates--great hulking split levels, all in the most nauseous pastels and dreadfully expensive too, I can't think why. No, but the place I want to show you has absolutely no connection with that." (page 30)